Tag Archives: New

200-million year old monster pushes back the clock on giant dinosaurs

At about 10 tons, Ingentia prima was the first giant dinosaur

Most of the classic creatures that come to mind when you think of dinosaurs are from the Cretaceous period, when evolution seems to have hit its stride and splashed out with things like the huge, long-necked sauropods. But dinosaurs weren’t always giants – during the earlier Triassic period they were mostly chicken-sized critters, and they didn’t really grow to be massive until the Jurassic. Now, the discovery of a new species in Argentina is pushing back the clock on dinosaur gigantism by up to 30 million years.

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Category: Science

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Four things recruiters look for to size up candidates’ potential

I’ve recruited countless graduates for roles in many organizations over the past decade, and I’m constantly asked what I look for. My answer is always the same: potential.

This is especially true for entry-level hires. Obviously, there’s no point in assessing recent grads the same way that you would more experienced candidates. Without much work experience or familiarity with the workplace, those candidates need to bring something else to the table–namely the ability to pick things up quickly and apply new ideas on their own. Here are a few concrete qualities that signal potential in entry-level (or any!) candidates–and what job seekers can do to show those traits off.

1. Determination

I currently work for a tech company called ThoughtWorks, which looks beyond traditional credentials like college majors and grades to make hiring decisions. To be a software developer you don’t necessarily have to have a computer science degree. Maybe you taught yourself to code in your free time, which tells me something much more powerful–that you’re committed to learning your craft and determined to succeed.

In fact, I’ve noticed recently that some of our most successful graduate hires in Australia have come to us through an intensive coding bootcamp, and what they sometimes lack in technical ability, they make up for with drive. Skills from elsewhere in their academic careers and previous work experience tend to be transferrable, as long as they’ve got grit and determination.

2. Passion

Passion and determination are close cousins but remain distinct. The former is about creativity and enthusiasm, and the latter is about strategy and ambition; both are strong predictors of potential.

To assess a candidate’s passion, I ask myself how excited they seem at the prospect of joining the team–and how excited am at bringing them on board. Will they introduce new ideas or fresh energy? What will they bring to the table? Everyone on a team can learn from each other, whether they’ve got 10 months’ or 10 years’ experience, so I tend to look for candidates who demonstrate creative thinking and an eagerness to learn. I also ask myself whether I’d be happy coaching or mentoring them, since their passion and enthusiasm will drive them forward and fuel their growth–but without it, their potential to learn diminishes.

3. Self-awareness

Ideally, every new hire should be able to grow with the organization, adapting to larger changes. To do that, they need to be aware of themselves and how they fit into the overall company culture.

Feedback is the key here. New hires need to be open to constructive criticism, otherwise they risk curbing their own potential to grow and evolve. But hiring managers and recruiters also need to be clear about the characteristics they don’t want to see as well as the ones they expect new hires to cultivate. So be sure to find someone who’s open to the ideas of others, respects their colleagues’ differences, and takes feedback well–in short, someone who’s sufficiently self-aware of their strengths and weaknesses to be able to learn and adapt.

4. Aptitude

Technical skills can be picked, and professional maturity comes with time and experience, but every new hire needs to be able to learn quickly in order to reach their full potential. And for that, there’s no substitute for good, old-fashioned aptitude.

Look for assessments and interview questions that let candidates demonstrate how inquisitive they are. You might even ask them to describe an experience when they had to learn something new on the fly. Some interviewers even devise exercises and practicums that give candidates a chance to collaborate on a shared outcome, and I’ve found this is often a great way to gauge potential: Don’t tell us what you can do, show us. There’s no better way to find out if someone has the ability to do something than by asking them to demonstrate it.

Keeping these attributes in mind can help you spot candidates with the most promise to grow into future leaders. And if you’re a job seeker, remember that recruiters and hiring managers are always assessing your potential, even if they haven’t devised a formal method for doing that. So when in doubt, take your own initiative and show off these four traits as best you can. They’ll never steer you wrong.


Yewande Ige is a global recruitment strategist at ThoughtWorks, which helps companies invent a new future and bring it to life with technology. In her 13 years at the company, Yewande has helped ThoughtWorks grow from several hundred progressive technologists to a diverse 4,000-person organization.

Will Philips is a graduate experience lead at ThoughtWorks. He has over 11 years of experience in campus recruiting across EMEA & APAC across a range of industries.

Rowheels launches its own pull-wheel wheelchair

The Rowheels Revolution's maintenance-free patented geared drive technology is said to help strengthen upper body and ...

Normally, wheelchair users move themselves along by pushing the rims of the two large wheels forward. But installing a set of Rowheels allows them to pull back on the rims, and still move forward. This is said to require less force than pushing and makes use of larger muscles. Now the company behind Rowheels has started selling a fully-kitted out wheelchair – the Revolution.

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Category: Health & Wellbeing

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PixelPlayer isolates the sound of individual instruments in music videos

Although a whole band playing together may make a song what it is, sometimes it’s interesting to know what an individual instrument within a band sounds like on its own. Thanks to a new system developed at MIT, viewers of musical performance videos should soon be able to find out.

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Category: Music

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New MRIs are so strong, they could cause mercury to leak from your teeth

A new study has found that new ultra-high-strength MRIs can cause toxic mercury to leak from ...

The fact mercury makes up roughly 50 percent of the content of dental amalgam is a contentious subject for many, and a new study that found MRIs can release the toxic heavy metal from fillings is sure to give those in the anti-amalgam camp even more to chew on. But before you start digging all the fillings from your teeth with a chisel, it’s worth noting that this effect was only found to relate to new ultra-high-strength MRIs.

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Scientists record coldest temperature ever seen on Earth's surface

Researchers have pinpointed parts of the East Antarctic Plateau as the coldest place on Earth

To say “Antarctica is cold” will surprise nobody, but just how cold it can get might. Researchers from the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) at the University of Colorado Boulder have now identified the coldest places on the planet, where the mercury plummets to almost -100° C (-148° F) under specific conditions.

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Category: Environment

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Fast-rising bedrock makes for surprisingly uplifting Antarctic news

The bedrock below Antarctica is rising surprisingly fast – and that could be enough to stabilize ...

News from Antarctica usually paints a grim picture of rapid ice loss and record-setting icebergs breaking loose, which is all feeding into a vicious cycle that speeds up further melting. But now, a new study reports some more uplifting findings: the Earth itself is rising at one of the fastest rates ever seen, and it may help stabilize the ice sheet.

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Category: Environment

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10 handheld games consoles you almost certainly didn't own – and with good reason

Nokia's ill-fated N-Gage

The history of portable games machines is festooned with joy. From Tetris on Nintendo’s original Game Boy through to the near-TV console experiences of latter-day Nintendo and Sony machines – the handheld console is a pillar of the industry. But for every success there are many others which do not evoke the same happy remembrances – or indeed any remembrances at all. And with good reason: they were spectacularly bad and/or unsuccessful. Here are 10 such prodigious flops.

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Category: Games

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Exciting insight into role gut bacteria play in obesity-related depression and anxiety

A new study has found gut bacteria may play a part in anxiety and depression seen ...

A compelling new study from researchers at Joslin Diabetes Center has shed more light on the mysterious connection between our diet, gut bacteria and mood. The study found that mice given a high-fat diet displayed greater depressive behaviors until microbiome-altering antibiotics returned their behavior back to normal.

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Category: Medical

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How therapy can reprogram the neurons that recall traumatic memories

The green shows a cell active when recalling a traumatic memory, the red is a cell ...

Neuroscientists at Switzerland’s EPFL have for the first time homed in directly on the specific cluster of neurons in the brain responsible for reprogramming long-term memories of traumatic experiences. The research brings neuroscience closer to answering the long-held question of whether therapy simply works to suppress fear-based memories or whether it actually helps rewrite those memories.

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Category: Biology

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