Tag Archives: good

sketching • Re: sketch feedback please

These show you have a good basic understanding. One piece of advice I thunk you could benefit from is sketch first, render second.

The things you should be exploring, defining, and communicating in the sketch are the core idea, proportion, function, aesthetic concept, rough concept of manufacturing approach.

Once you have those things sorted you can begin to render color, material, finishes in a persuasive way.

It becomes difficult to evaluate these sketches because the core idea is not evident yet. What do these product do? What scale are they? The answers to these key questions should be evident in the drawing.

For example, I might guess that the first sketch is a handheld vacuum? Is that the best view to show the design? Is the handgrip proportionate to the body? Should there be a larger disc collection chamber and motor housing?

I’d love to see the answers to these questions in some follow up sketches.


Scientists To Trump: Stop Trying To Use Racist AI

ICE wants a machine learning system to automate its decision-making. Scientists, engineers, and technologists say it’s a bad idea.

Machine learning algorithms are good at a lot of things, but they’re not so good at producing unbiased results–especially when they’re working with data that’s already biased. Yet the Trump administration is looking for a way to automate immigration decisions using AI based on biased and irrelevant information. And now, scientists are refusing.

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design employment • Re: How to handle pricing as a freelance designer

yo wrote:
Found it:

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Thanks for posting that, it’s such a good way to approach pricing. The company I work for recently had a client blow up in anger when they were told that they would have to start paying for my time (design is sold for free normally :x – it’s a sheet metal workshop), and demand that it remain free or they would get their product manufactured elsewhere. It’s amazing how many clients expect something complex to take an hour or two and only cost them a few hundred bucks.

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general design discussion • Re: Tradeshow experiences that impressed

I worked on the design of 4 years of CES trade show booths, 4 years of CEDIA trade show booths. I concentrated my value in the same way, overall concept, design theme, and direction. I then worked with a design/build shop that only worked on trade show booths. I felt like that was a good mix. My team also did all of the final graphics. A few things I learned from the many many mistakes I made.

1) give aways, no one cares. The first couple of years I spent a lot of time on this and it doesn’t matter. One year we even had a coffee shop inside the booth. This proved incredibly difficult, incredibly expensive, and resulted in a line up the hall for shmoes who wants free coffee.

2) develop an overall concept, and then work on the simplest, most effective way to tell that simple story. One year I did an installation of almost every sku Polk and Definitive made hung in a salon art gallery style. Very fun simple idea… until you have to ship 500 sky’s to Vegas and it takes the instal team 2 days to set it up, 2 days to tear it down, and no one cared because it didn’t tell a story other than we make a lot of stuff. The more successful years focused on a small portion of the product line, or better yet, a concept. One year we did “audiophile grade wireless home”… simple, and pointed out implicitly that the competitors were not audiophile level.

3) go high. Seems simple, but make sure your booth has clear sight lines (picking the booth location is super important to the design) and make sure you have the appropriate size signage and messaging for the eyeline. IE up at the ceiling, giant logo for across the hall viewing. Midway up tagline and secondary logo for 50-100 ft away. Just above human height, key messaging for less than 15ft away viewing.

4) have an instagram moment. One of our competitors came every year with a 10″ pair of headphones you can walk between. I thought it was dumb, but then I watched people take selfies under the headphones for 4 days straight… for 4 years straight…


general design discussion • Re: Tradeshow experiences that impressed

Well, one of the things I learned is to keep things very portable, lightweight and good for transportation. Unless you want to end up with the back of your truck transformed into a jumbled mess. It also helps to have a 3D preview of your booth before starting the installation (yes we didn’t always use to do that). And make sure you put the interesting things on the outside of the booth near the walking aisles, for visitors it is like entering shops and most of them rather see the window shop first.


general design discussion • Re: Tradeshow experiences that impressed

ralphzoontjens wrote:
Well, one of the things I learned is to keep things very portable, lightweight and good for transportation. Unless you want to end up with the back of your truck transformed into a jumbled mess. It also helps to have a 3D preview of your booth before starting the installation (yes we didn’t always use to do that). And make sure you put the interesting things on the outside of the booth near the walking aisles, for visitors it is like entering shops and most of them rather see the window shop first.

Great points about putting things on the outside. Luckily transportation isn’t a HUGE issue because we usually send a crate or two over for the big shows, but the mobility aspect that you mentioned could be nice to consider for breaking down aspects for smaller shows we could send our own vehicles to.

Good points also iab, we try to keep the giveaways minimal and focus more on the experience.


An Iridescent Optical Illusion Brings This Furniture To Life

The Color Flow series is iridescence on steroids.

From the shelves of Forever 21 to the show floor of international design fairs, one trend has strong armed its way into our visual landscape over the past few years: iridescence. For good reason, too. These dazzling rainbow hues are an exciting antidote to the dour and restrained aesthetic that reigned during the recession’s belt tightening.

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