sheryl-sandberg-and-pat-mitchell1

Further reading (and watching) on women and the workplace

Sheryl Sandberg shakes hands with Pat Mitchell, who urged her to talk about women and leadership at TEDWomen in 2010. The talk became Sandberg’s book, Lean In. Photo: Kristoffer Heacox
During an interview at TEDWomen 2013, host Pat Mitchell asked Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg to explain how her 2010 TED Talk evolved.

Sheryl Sandberg: So we leaned in … now what?

“I asked myself the question that Mark Zuckerberg, the founder of Facebook and my boss, asks all of us, which is: What would I do if I wasn’t afraid?” Sandberg said. Her answer: “I would get on the TED stage and talk about women and leadership. And I did. And survived.”
And let’s be honest, she didn’t just survive. Her talk has been viewed more than 3 million times so far. It spawned a best-selling book, Lean In. In fact, with her talk, Sandberg launched a full-scale movement

Sheryl Sandberg: Why we have too few women leaders

: there are now over 12,000 “Lean In Circles,” essentially support groups for working women, across 50 countries. “I’m grateful, I’m honored, I’m happy,” says Sandberg. “And it’s the

Link to source

sheryl-sandberg-and-pat-mitchell

Further reading (and watching) on women and the workplace

Sheryl Sandberg shakes hands with Pat Mitchell, who urged her to talk about women and leadership at TEDWomen in 2010. The talk became Sandberg’s book, Lean In. Photo: Kristoffer Heacox
During an interview at TEDWomen 2013, host Pat Mitchell asked Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg to explain how her 2010 TED Talk evolved.

Sheryl Sandberg: So we leaned in … now what?

“I asked myself the question that Mark Zuckerberg, the founder of Facebook and my boss, asks all of us, which is: What would I do if I wasn’t afraid?” Sandberg said. Her answer: “I would get on the TED stage and talk about women and leadership. And I did. And survived.”
And let’s be honest, she didn’t just survive. Her talk has been viewed more than 3 million times so far. It spawned a best-selling book, Lean In. In fact, with her talk, Sandberg launched a full-scale movement

Sheryl Sandberg: Why we have too few women leaders

: there are now over 12,000 “Lean In Circles,” essentially support groups for working women, across 50 countries. “I’m grateful, I’m honored, I’m happy,” says Sandberg. “And it’s the

Link to source

Further reading (and watching) on women and the workplace

Sheryl Sandberg shakes hands with Pat Mitchell, who urged her to talk about women and leadership at TEDWomen in 2010. The talk became Sandberg’s book, Lean In. Photo: Kristoffer Heacox
During an interview at TEDWomen 2013, host Pat Mitchell asked Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg to explain how her 2010 TED Talk evolved.

Sheryl Sandberg: So we leaned in … now what?

“I asked myself the question that Mark Zuckerberg, the founder of Facebook and my boss, asks all of us, which is: What would I do if I wasn’t afraid?” Sandberg said. Her answer: “I would get on the TED stage and talk about women and leadership. And I did. And survived.”
And let’s be honest, she didn’t just survive. Her talk has been viewed more than 3 million times so far. It spawned a best-selling book, Lean In. In fact, with her talk, Sandberg launched a full-scale movement

Sheryl Sandberg: Why we have too few women leaders

: there are now over 12,000 “Lean In Circles,” essentially support groups for working women, across 50 countries. “I’m grateful, I’m honored, I’m happy,” says Sandberg. “And it’s the

sheryl-sandberg-and-pat-mitchell

Further reading (and watching) on women and the workplace

Sheryl Sandberg shakes hands with Pat Mitchell, who urged her to talk about women and leadership at TEDWomen in 2010. The talk became Sandberg’s book, Lean In. Photo: Kristoffer Heacox
During an interview at TEDWomen 2013, host Pat Mitchell asked Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg to explain how her 2010 TED Talk evolved.
Sheryl Sandberg: So we leaned in … now what?“I asked myself the question that Mark Zuckerberg, the founder of Facebook and my boss, asks all of us, which is: What would I do if I wasn’t afraid?” Sandberg said. Her answer: “I would get on the TED stage and talk about women and leadership. And I did. And survived.”
And let’s be honest, she didn’t just survive. Her talk has been viewed more than 3 million times so far. It spawned a best-selling book, Lean In. In fact, with her talk, Sandberg launched a full-scale movementSheryl Sandberg: Why we have too few women leaders: there are now over 12,000 “Lean In Circles,” essentially support groups for working women, across 50 countries. “I’m grateful, I’m honored, I’m happy,” says Sandberg. “And it’s the

Link to source