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What can you learn from 10 Ads Worth Spreading? Read our whitepaper

Each year, TED chooses 10 great ads to feature as part of our Ads Worth Spreading challenge. And this week, we’re featuring a whitepaper (PDF) that analyzes what makes some of those great ads great.
The Ads Worth Spreading whitepaper chronicles the story behind this year’s 10 winning ads from their creative directors, and offers insights and findings from TED, Google and Ace Metrix on why each proved so effective.
A recurring theme of the research boils down to the question: What does advertising do? The best advertising doesn’t wave goods in front of consumers’ faces — it reflects a brand’s values. More than ever, brands need to be brave enough to say something authentic and meaningful, or run the risk of being forgotten. TED’s Ads Worth Spreading shines a spotlight on creative advertising that uses the power of storytelling to express ideas and engage audiences in a meaningful way. Ads Worth Spreading rewards advertising that takes a stand – and challenges other brands to up their game.
Google Think Insights posted an excerpt from the Ads Worth Spreading report today … or

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What can you learn from 10 Ads Worth Spreading? Read our whitepaper

Each year, TED chooses 10 great ads to feature as part of our Ads Worth Spreading challenge. And this week, we’re featuring a whitepaper (PDF) that analyzes what makes some of those great ads great.
The Ads Worth Spreading whitepaper chronicles the story behind this year’s 10 winning ads from their creative directors, and offers insights and findings from TED, Google and Ace Metrix on why each proved so effective.
A recurring theme of the research boils down to the question: What does advertising do? The best advertising doesn’t wave goods in front of consumers’ faces — it reflects a brand’s values. More than ever, brands need to be brave enough to say something authentic and meaningful, or run the risk of being forgotten. TED’s Ads Worth Spreading shines a spotlight on creative advertising that uses the power of storytelling to express ideas and engage audiences in a meaningful way. Ads Worth Spreading rewards advertising that takes a stand – and challenges other brands to up their game.
Google Think Insights posted an excerpt from the Ads Worth Spreading report today … or

Link to source

paul-kemp-robertson-at-tg2013

10 alternative currencies, from Bitcoin to BerkShares to sweat to laundry detergent

Paul Kemp-Robertson talks about how non-government currencies are gaining consumer trust at TEDGlobal 2013. Photo: Bret Hartman
“Is there a reason for governments to be in charge of money?” asks Paul Kemp-Robertson in today’s talk. Judging by the new raft of alternative currencies—from digital coins to point systems that reward customers of a certain brand—the answer might someday be “no.” Again.

Paul Kemp-Robertson: Bitcoin. Sweat. Tide. Meet the future of branded currency.

As Kemp-Robertson suggests, many people seem to trust brands more than governments these days. Since currency is, in a sense, an expression of the brand value of a government, why shouldn’t commercial brands also make currency?
Kemp-Robertson reminds us that, once, they did. As an example, before the US Civil War, 1,600 different corporations, mainly private banks, issued paper banknotes. The government only issued coins, a mere 4 percent of American currency. The Civil War upended that system (read more) and eventually led to the creation of a single currency issued by the Federal Reserve System.
Here, learn more about 10 kinds of alternative currency in use today, from Kemp-Robertson’s talk and beyond.

Bitcoin.

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paul-kemp-robertson-at-tg2013

10 alternative currencies, from Bitcoin to BerkShares to sweat to laundry detergent

Paul Kemp-Robertson talks about how non-government currencies are gaining consumer trust at TEDGlobal 2013. Photo: Bret Hartman
“Is there a reason for governments to be in charge of money?” asks Paul Kemp-Robertson in today’s talk. Judging by the new raft of alternative currencies—from digital coins to point systems that reward customers of a certain brand—the answer might someday be “no.” Again.
Paul Kemp-Robertson: Bitcoin. Sweat. Tide. Meet the future of branded currency.As Kemp-Robertson suggests, many people seem to trust brands more than governments these days. Since currency is, in a sense, an expression of the brand value of a government, why shouldn’t commercial brands also make currency?
Kemp-Robertson reminds us that, once, they did. As an example, before the US Civil War, 1,600 different corporations, mainly private banks, issued paper banknotes. The government only issued coins, a mere 4 percent of American currency. The Civil War upended that system (read more) and eventually led to the creation of a single currency issued by the Federal Reserve System.
Here, learn more about 10 kinds of alternative currency in use today, from Kemp-Robertson’s talk and beyond.

Bitcoin.

Link to source

bob-lord-1

Millennials, learn to code, says Razorfish CEO at TED Annex

Three young professionals hold Bob Lord’s book, “Converge.” Lord’s biggest piece of advice for the young—learn to code. Photo: Mackler Studios
“Your lifestyle is the future of marketing,” Bob Lord told a group of young New Yorkers at the TED Annex (our new spillover office) on Tuesday night. About 80 interns and young professionals from local marketing firms came together to eat pizza and hear Lord’s advice on merging creativity and digital know-how, during a conversation with TED’s own Ronda Carnegie.
Lord is the global CEO of digital marketing agency Razorfish, but his bachelor’s degree is in engineering — and he describes his background in programming robots as crucial to the way he shapes brand experiences today. “Technology is the engine that makes marketing work,” he said, “Especially when you have the technical background to be able to say ‘API’ without being afraid of it.”
Following some nervous giggles in the room — there were definitely some API-phobes in the audience — Bob elaborated on the conceptual changes he has seen in the marketing industry during his career. Watching Mad Men is not

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bob-lord-1

Millennials, learn to code, says Razorfish CEO at TED Annex

Three young professionals hold Bob Lord’s book, “Converge.” Lord’s biggest piece of advice for the young—learn to code. Photo: Mackler Studios
“Your lifestyle is the future of marketing,” Bob Lord told a group of young New Yorkers at the TED Annex (our new spillover office) on Tuesday night. About 80 interns and young professionals from local marketing firms came together to eat pizza and hear Lord’s advice on merging creativity and digital know-how, during a conversation with TED’s own Ronda Carnegie.
Lord is the global CEO of digital marketing agency Razorfish, but his bachelor’s degree is in engineering — and he describes his background in programming robots as crucial to the way he shapes brand experiences today. “Technology is the engine that makes marketing work,” he said, “Especially when you have the technical background to be able to say ‘API’ without being afraid of it.”
Following some nervous giggles in the room — there were definitely some API-phobes in the audience — Bob elaborated on the conceptual changes he has seen in the marketing industry during his career. Watching Mad Men is not

Link to source